Latest Issue of the AAHGS Journal Now Available to Members

At long last, the Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society has come back!  Articles featured in Volume 26, Issue 1 are:

Narrative of a Former Slave’s Recollection, by Patricia Carter Slubly

Register of Colored Persons of Smyth County, State of Virginia Cohabitating Together as Husband and Wife on 27th February 1866, by Jeff Weaver

George William Warfield (1837-1919) Ex-Slave and Civil War Veteran, by Carolyn Warfield

Fugitives from Enslavement as Abstracted from Price George’s County Commissioner of Slave Statistics, by Patsy Fletcher

“Sketch of the Life and Labors of Rev. Henry Highland Garnet” A Second Look, by Kathleen Vlesor, Ed.D

Finding Emma Pullen, by Debora Pullen Plunkett

Guilford Hervey and Descendants, by Jacqueline E. A. Lawson and Cynthia A. W. Wilson

Along with the above, a call for historical and genealogical papers to submit to the journal on the theme of “African American Lives in Context” as well as book reviews on The Segregated scholars:  Black Social Scientists and the Creation of Black Labor Studies, 1890-1950, Francille Rusan Wilson (2006); and Clinging to Mammy:  The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America, Micki McElya (2007) are included.

It’s great to see the Journal back up and running again!

ASAALH Mourns the Passing of Dr. John Hope Franklin at 94.

From the ASAALH newsletter:

John Hope Franklin, the scholar who was a pioneer in the field of African American history and dominated it for nearly six decades, has died at the age of 94.

Franklin, James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History, was a scholar who brought intellectual rigor as well as an engaged passion to his work. He wrote about history – one of his books, From Slavery to Freedom, is considered a core text on the African American experience, more than 60 years after its publication – and he lived it.

Franklin worked on the Brown v. Board of Education (1954) case, joined protestors in a 1965 march led by Martin Luther King, Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. and headed President Clinton’s 1997 National Advisory Board on Race.

Though Dr. Franklin gained national recognition for his work on President Clinton’s 1997 task force on race, his reputation as a scholar was made in 1947 with the publication of his book, “From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans,” which is still considered the definitive account of the black experience in America.
At the 92nd Annual ASALH convention, we had the privilege of honoring Dr. Franklin and this seminal work. Conventioneers and the public were treated to conversations and special moments with Dr. Franklin who relayed stories from his life that helped to shape him into the scholar that he became.
He received more than 130 honorary degrees, and served as president of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, the American Studies Association, the Southern Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association and was a Life Member of ASALH, former ASALH National Vice President, and a member of the ASALH Advisory Board until his death.

The Executive Council of ASALH is proud to say that we had the honor to work with and know Dr. John Hope Franklin and it is with sad and heavy hearts that we give him back to the Lord.

“Dr. Franklin never waivered in his support for ASALH,” said Sylvia Cyrus, ASALH Executive Director. “Recently he lent his voice to the ASALH project “Freedom’s Song” on the Tulsa Race Riots. Through this video generations will continue to learn from Dr. Franklin, a tireless educator and dignified American.”

“We have lost a strong supporter and a dear friend,” said Dr. John E. Fleming, ASALH National President. “He has left a void in the world of history that will not soon be filled.”

There will be a celebration of his life and of his late wife Aurelia Franklin at 11 a.m. June 11 in Duke Chapel in honor of their 69th wedding anniversary.

– The Officers, Executive Council, and Advisory Board of ASALH “Founders of Black History Month”

African American Anthem

My friend Leona Martin, President of the AAHGS New England Chapter, forwarded this link – it is a four minute and fifty-eight second YouTube video sung by Grace Baptist Church Cathedral Choir on inauguration day in Mount Vernon, New York. In a microcosm it shows a timeline of African American history – how many historical moments and figures can you recognize?

Thank you Leona for sharing this beautiful and powerful video with us.

January/February 2009 News at the Printer

For those of you waiting with baited breath — the January/February issue of  AAHGS News is at the printer finally!  We’re hopeful to return to a normal printing schedule with the March/April issue.  Thank you for your patience!

Soon to follow:  an index of the links for the Jan/Feb ’09 issue.