AAHGS ANNUAL CONFERENCE CALL FOR PAPERS 2010

The Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society (AAHGS) is pleased to announce the 2010 Conference Call for Papers, to be presented at our next Annual Conference, 7-10 October 2010, in Adelphia, Maryland.  The AAHGS Conference endeavors each year to provide the premier opportunity to explore standard and innovative methods, resources, and strategies centered around African-American, Caribbean and Native American genealogy as well as the expansive history of the African in the Diaspora.

The following focus areas are offered as suggestions for session topics

·       African American History

·       Caribbean-American Research

·       African American Migration (varied)

·       Periods of War: Revolutionary War; Civil War; WWI; WWII;

·       African Americans in New England, Pre-Civil War

·       Use of Technology in research (Not product sales presentations)

·       Church/Religious History in the African American Experience

·       The Civil Rights Movement

·       Research methodologies (various levels)

·       State Specific Research Resources; Adoption Records

·       Local history, i.e. town histories; institutions; industrial history as it relates to the African American experience

·       Native American/African American experience

·       Blacks in the West;

The topics are merely suggestions. We are looking for presenters that have solidly researched their topic area, are able to inform a diverse audience and deliver insightful and enjoyable presentations.  Authors and possible candidates for keynote and general assembly gatherings may also submit their proposals.

Proposal Format:

I.             Session Title

II.            Name(s) of Session Presenters – indicate lead

III.          Research skill level of audience

IV.          Purpose/learning objective

V.            Session description- Provide narrative of information to be covered in the presentation  (This information will be included in the Conference Syllabus).

VI.          Include presenter(s) biographical information.

VII.         Include list of resources and/or bibliography.

VIII.       AV Requirements (this must be included in your initial proposal):

Please indicate the type of audio/visual equipment that will be required for your presentation. Examples:

§      I will be using Power Point for my presentation. I will bring my own laptop, but will need a projector

§      I will use Power Point and will provide my own equipment

§      I am using Power Point and will need a laptop, and projector from AAHGS.

Finally indicate if you need an overhead projector, slide projector, TV/VCR, DVD, flip chart, portable sound system, microphone, table or podium.

Considerations:

1.     All presenters agree to participate at their own expense. A token of appreciation is offered, however it does not cover conference costs. Please take this into consideration before submitting or agreeing to participate.

2.     Session materials, bios, etc will be included in the Conference Syllabus.

Proposals must be received no later than 30 July 2010 and should not exceed 12 pages.  Proposals must include  all required information, including: your complete name; email address; telephone number(s); and postal mail address.   Notice of acceptance or rejection will be sent by 15 August 2010.

Presenters may submit proposals via postal mail or by email.  Material submitted via email must be in Microsoft® Word format. Proposals submitted via email should be sent to <info@aahgs.org> with “2010 AAHGS Conference” in the subject line.  Proposals submitted by postal mail should be sent to: AAHGS 2010 Annual Conference, PO Box 73067, Washington, D.C. 20056.

For additional information or with questions about the submission requirements, contact: Jerry Hynson, AAHGS Vice President of History, at <jerryhyn@copper.net>.  Do not email conference proposals to Jerry’s email address; send proposals to <info@aahgs.org> with “2010 AAHGS Conference” in the subject line.

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Tim Pinnick Launches The Black Genealogist and Black Newspaper Notes

Tim Pinnick, a very talented genealogist from Illinois, has added two more publications to his roster of writings:  The Black Genealogist and Black Newspaper Notes.  These ezines are his latest offerings to interested researchers of African American history.  You may remember Tim as the author of Finding and Using African American Newspapers, a handy volume detailing the availability of black newspapers and the gems they contain. Once again he has come out with a useful set of publications filled with links, stories, and reviews of interesting books and materials  pertaining to the history and culture of the black American.

In the inaugural issue of The Black Genealogist Tim reviews the book  Here I Lay My Burdens Down: A History of the Black Cemeteries of Richmond, Virginia.  You will have to judge for yourself, but I know I want to read it. Black Newspaper Notes doesn’t disappoint either — the ezine is loaded with links to sites containing black newspapers as well as explaining why you should visit them.  An article at the bottom reviews the Indianapolis Freeman and particularly its stories on the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers which details the types of genealogical and social history information found in these newspapers that really puts the flesh on the bones of your ancestors while in many cases giving you a family structure.  Fascinating.

You can find out more about Tim and sign up for his publications here:

http://www.blackcoalminerheritage.net/

Afri-Quest, The People’s Archive

I have not seen this site before, but it claims to be a collaborative free genealogical information site.  From the website:

Welcome to Afriquest, the free online database for records of African American genealogy and history. Afriquest is a place to share and preserve documents, images and family oral history. Every document, image or story you add to Afriquest will be preserved and will remain free to access, for generations to come.

Everything you share here belongs to you – you may edit your content or remove it at any time. Welcome to YOUR Afriquest: The People’s Archive!

I thought the initial concept was like a wiki, but it appears that the site reviews what is submitted for publication prior to posting.

Has anyone used this site?  I like the basic premise.  Check it out for yourself at http://www.afriquest.com

African American Genealogy Links Page

I found what appears to be a very comprehensive page of links on African American Genealogy:

http://www.africanaheritage.com/Eleanors_Links.asp

Check it out and let me know what you think.

Digital Library of Georgia Puts Three Historic Newpapers Online Free

From the AfriGeneas site:

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the free online availability of three historic Georgia newspapers: the Macon Telegraph Archive,
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/telegraph, the Columbus Enquirer Archive,http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/enquirer, and the Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive, http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/milledgeville. Additional newspaper digitization projects are currently underway and will be announced as they become available online. For more information, please contact http://www.galileo.usg.edu/contact/.

UNC Chapel Hill Presents African Americans in the South Exhibit

From October 8, 2009 – February 5, 2010, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will present an exhibit detailing life and culture of African Americans in the South.  The exhibit is entitled We Shall Not Be Moved:  African Americans in the South, 18th Century to the Present.

The exhibit features newly aquired items and documents never before seen and the release of the online edition of the Guide to African American Resources in the Southern Historical Collection.

The link to the Southern Historical Collection is here:

http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/shc/index.html

On a related topic – a listing of resources online for North Carolina are located here:

http://www.upress.virginia.edu/epub/pyatt/PyaAfro2.html

Black Abolitionist Papers Now Online

According to the American Library Association’s African American Studies Librarians Section:  Covering the time period between 1830 and 1865, this collection of primary source records “…is the first to comprehensively detail the extensive work of African Americans to abolish slavery in the United States prior to the Civil War.”

The record set, put online by ProQuest, covers about 15,000 works of approximately 300 Black abolitionists in the U.S., Canada, the British Isles, France, and Germany.  It does not appear that one would be able to access this at home without going through a public library access account or visiting your local library, but it is a great collection and one worth perusing if you have a chance.

The urls are:  http://bap.chadwyck.com and is part of the Black Studies Center at http://bsc.chadwyck.com

 

Gilder Lehrman Online John Brown Exhibition

 

If you cannot make it to either the Massachusetts Historical Society to hear the lectures and see the exhibit on John Brown, perhaps you can see the exhibit at the New York Historical Society that runs from September 15, 2009 through March 25, 2010.

If you cannot do either — you’re in luck.  Visit Gilder Lehrman’s website at

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/collection/online/johnbrown/

to see the online exhibit.  If you have never visited this site before, you’re in for a treat.  Not only can you see original documents able to be enlarged so you can read them — they have transcriptions as well.

Enjoy!

Forgotten Patriots wins the Jacobus Award

At its meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, on 10 October 2009, the American Society of Genealogists voted to give their annual Donald Lines Jacobus Award to FORGOTTEN PATRIOITS, AFRICAN AMERICAN AND AMERICAN INDIAN PATRIOTS IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR: A GUIDE TO SERVICE, SOURCES, AND STUDIES, edited by Eric Grundset, Director of the DAR Library in Washington, D.C., and published by the DAR in 2008. wins the Jacobus Award

Researched by Briana L. Diaz, Hollis L. Gentry, and Jean D. Strahan, as well as by the editor, this substantial reference work has a general introduction, state-by-state introductions, sources, and bibliography, an alphabetical list of names with source codes, maps, photographs, and a glossary of obscure words found in the original records. Many appendices deal with topics such as documenting the color of soldiers and using names as clues to finding them. It is not a collection of biographies but a compilation of source references for individual soldiers that will greatly improve the breadth and accuracy of research.

Since Revolutionary War service is often the starting point for research on families of color, this book opens new doors in an increasingly compelling field of genealogy.

The Donald Lines Jacobus Award was established in 1972 to encourage sound scholarship in genealogical writing. It is presented to a model genealogical work published within the previous five years. A list of the books receiving the award in previous years appears on the American Society of Genealogists website (www.fasg.org). Anyone planning to publish their own research, especially as a compiled genealogy or family history, would do well to study the format and style of these books.

Author Tony Burroughs Comments on Michele Obama’s Genealogy

Tony Burroughs has written a commentary on the story of Michelle Obama’s genealogy which has seen quite a lot of press lately.

You can find the article here:

http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/10/14/burroughs.obama.genealogy/

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