African Ancestry Seminar at African American Cultural Forum in Hampton, VA

The following announcement was written by African Ancestry:

May 5, 2010 — On Saturday, June 26, the African American Cultural Forum, a brand new event taking place in downtown Hampton coinciding with the Afrikan American Festival, will welcome African Ancestry. The genetic genealogy company, based in Washington, DC, is known for using DNA to create “a vehicle to enable people of African descent to trace their ancestry back to their present-day African country of origin.” Afrikan Ancestry will conduct free genealogy and family tree seminars at the Crowne Plaza Hampton Marina Hotel.

“We are very excited to welcome Gina Paige and Dr. Rick Kittles, co-founders of African Ancestry, to Hampton,” said African American Cultural Forum Committee member Pam Croom. “The duo is renowned for their work in DNA and genealogy. Our attendees are in for a very special treat.”

African Ancestry has been featured on several television programs, including Good Morning America, African American Lives on PBS, and VH1 Soul, as well as print publications like USA Today, Essence, and Black Enterprise. In addition, the company has also traced DNA for many African American celebrities, including Oprah Winfrey, Forrest Whitaker, Spike Lee, and Isaiah Washington.

The cost to attend the African Ancestry seminars is free. Those wishing to have their ancestry traced via DNA or have family trees researched can do so for an additional fee.

During the African American Cultural Forum, African Ancestry will unveil the DNA tests of esteemed Hampton resident Dr. Mary T. Christian. Dr. Christian, who began her academic career at Hampton Institute (now Hampton University), later returned to the university as Director of the School of Education, rising to Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Education, before retiring as professor emeritus. In 1985, Dr. Christian was the first African American and first female from Hampton to be elected to the state legislature, post Reconstruction. She served nine consecutive terms representing Virginia’s 92nd House District. The results of the Dr. Christian’s DNA test will be unveiled at 10:45 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. on Saturday, June 26 (during both African Ancestry sessions at the African American Cultural Forum).

The African American Cultural Forum takes place at the Crowne Plaza Hampton Marina Hotel 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 26. Seminar topics include restoration of rights, gang awareness, family trees, and genealogy. Noted poet, author, and literary consultant Nathan Richardson is also scheduled to be in attendance, conducting seminars and workshops. All seminars and workshops are free. The event coincides with Afrikan American Festival, a Hampton 400th Anniversary Signature Event, happening that same weekend in nearby Mill Point Park.

For more information of African Ancestry, check outwww.africanancestry.com. For further information on the African American Cultural Forum, contact Pam Croom at 757/728-5173 or pcroom(at)hampton(dot)gov.

Advertisements

Tim Pinnick Launches The Black Genealogist and Black Newspaper Notes

Tim Pinnick, a very talented genealogist from Illinois, has added two more publications to his roster of writings:  The Black Genealogist and Black Newspaper Notes.  These ezines are his latest offerings to interested researchers of African American history.  You may remember Tim as the author of Finding and Using African American Newspapers, a handy volume detailing the availability of black newspapers and the gems they contain. Once again he has come out with a useful set of publications filled with links, stories, and reviews of interesting books and materials  pertaining to the history and culture of the black American.

In the inaugural issue of The Black Genealogist Tim reviews the book  Here I Lay My Burdens Down: A History of the Black Cemeteries of Richmond, Virginia.  You will have to judge for yourself, but I know I want to read it. Black Newspaper Notes doesn’t disappoint either — the ezine is loaded with links to sites containing black newspapers as well as explaining why you should visit them.  An article at the bottom reviews the Indianapolis Freeman and particularly its stories on the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers which details the types of genealogical and social history information found in these newspapers that really puts the flesh on the bones of your ancestors while in many cases giving you a family structure.  Fascinating.

You can find out more about Tim and sign up for his publications here:

http://www.blackcoalminerheritage.net/

Afri-Quest, The People’s Archive

I have not seen this site before, but it claims to be a collaborative free genealogical information site.  From the website:

Welcome to Afriquest, the free online database for records of African American genealogy and history. Afriquest is a place to share and preserve documents, images and family oral history. Every document, image or story you add to Afriquest will be preserved and will remain free to access, for generations to come.

Everything you share here belongs to you – you may edit your content or remove it at any time. Welcome to YOUR Afriquest: The People’s Archive!

I thought the initial concept was like a wiki, but it appears that the site reviews what is submitted for publication prior to posting.

Has anyone used this site?  I like the basic premise.  Check it out for yourself at http://www.afriquest.com

African American Genealogy Links Page

I found what appears to be a very comprehensive page of links on African American Genealogy:

http://www.africanaheritage.com/Eleanors_Links.asp

Check it out and let me know what you think.

Tom Joyner Wants Pardon for Wrongly Convicted Uncles

Nationally syndicated radio host Tom Joyner is asking South Carolina to posthumously pardon two of his great-uncles — black landowners executed in 1915 after being convicted of murdering an elderly Confederate Army veteran.

Read the full story here:

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jYdmHE3-2MZ2yA5tbmCQgR-Ss9YwD9B707KG3

Massachusetts Group Hopes to Save Underground Railroad House

In Concord, Massachusetts a battle looms.  The Caesar-Robbins house, believed to be a stop on the Underground Railroad, lost its owner last year when he passed away.  The new owners filed papers to have the house demolished back in March 2009.  Because of the house’s historical significance, the demolition was stayed for six months per law.

A preservation group called the Drinking Gourd Project hopes to raise enough money to save it.  See the full story here:

http://www.preservationnation.org/magazine/2009/todays-news/group-hopes-to-save.html

Slave Narratives Now in AAHGS News

The slave narratives recorded by writers with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1930s provide incredible insight into the interviewees’ lives in slavery and freedom.

Starting with the September/October 2009 issue of AAHGS News available to members of AAHGS or by ordering single issues from the website at www.aahgs.org, this new feature further expands that documentation by sharing stories about the lives of former slaves and their descendants in freedom.

The September/October 2009 issue features the exciting accomplishments of the Toles family of Columbus, Georgia,  just one generation after slavery.

CSI: Collecting, Selecting, Identifying Your Ancestors

The Alabama Genealogical Society’s fall seminar, CSI:  Collecting, Selecting, Identifying Your Ancestors, will be held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, Alabama.

J. Mark Lowe, professional genealogist, author, and lecturer will present Researching on the Internet, Land Barons or Dirt Farmers, and Finding Your Landless Ancestors.  For registration information see their website at:

www.algensoc.org/main/seminars.html

AAGHSC Chicago Presents 27th Annual Family History Conference

The Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago (AAGHSC) presents its 27th Annual Family History Conference October 9-10, 2009.  This is the 30th anniversary of the AAGHSC.  The conference will feature workshops and opportunities to network with authors regarding their historical and genealogical writings.

For more informtion go to their website at www.aaghsc.org.

Links in the November/Decmeber 2008 Issue of AAHGS News

Here is the list of weblinks for the articles appearing in the November/December 2008 issue of AAHGS News:

p. 3:  “Black Studies” NARA Catalog:  www.estore.archives.gov

p. 5:  Boston University’s Genealogical Research Certificate Program:  http://professional.bu.edu/cpe/Genealogy.asp

p. 6:  Enumerator Instructions Online http://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/tEnumInstr.shtml

p. 6:  Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database  www.slavevoyages.org/tast/database/index.faces

p. 6  AfriGeneas Forums:  Heritage Arts & Crafts:  www.afrigeneas.com/forum-crafts

p. 6  AfriGeneas Forums:  AfriGeneas at the Movies:  www.afrigeneas.com/forum-movies

p. 7:  On the Bookshelf selections:

Index to Virginia Estates, 1800-1865, Volume 9:  www.vgs.org/publications.htm

Index to District of Columbia Estates, 1801-1929:  http://users.erols.com/pipp OR www.heritagebooks.com

African American Slavery, Indenture & Resistance in Illinois 1720-1864  www.costonie.com

The Washingtons of Wessyington Plantation www.wessyington.com

p. 9:  Mississippi to Africa:  A Journey of Discovery www.mississippitoafrica.com

p. 10:  Slave Births in New Jersey Online  www.njarchives.org/links/guides/chncl004.html

p. 10:  Navy personnel FREE access to Ancestry and HeritageQuest  wwwa.nko.navy.mil/portal

p. 11:  Florida State University’s Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration:  www.fsu.edu/news/2009/01/08/king.celebration

p. 12:  Booker T. Washington Online at Library of Congress:  www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/btwashington/index.html

p. 14:  Free at Last?  Slavery in Pittsburgh in the 18th and 19th Centuries  www.imdiversity.com/villages/african/pitt_slavery1008.asp

p. 16:  Events listings:  Virginia Beach Genealogical Society www.rootsweb.com/~vavbgs

The International Black Genealogy Summit (IBGS)  www.acpl.lib.in.us

NGS Family History Conference:  www.ncgenealogy.org/blogs/ngs2009

p. 18:  African American Genealogy Sources in the Louisiana Division of the New Orleans Public Library  http://nutrias.org/guides/black.htm

p. 20:  An Anthology of Respect:  The Pullman Porter National Historic Registry (1st Ed.)  www.aphiliprandolphmuseum.com/anthology-of-respect.htm

« Older entries